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Ružmarin


Rosmarinus officinalis, commonly known as rosemary, is a woody, perennial herb with fragrant, evergreen, needle-like leaves and white, pink, purple, or blue flowers, native to the Mediterranean region. It is a member of the mint family Lamiaceae, which includes many other herbs.

The name "rosemary" derives from the Latin for "dew" (ros) and "sea" (marinus), or "dew of the sea". The plant is also sometimes called anthos, from the ancient Greek word ἄνθος, meaning "flower". Rosemary has a fibrous root system.

Lavanda


Lavandula (common name lavender) is a genus of 39 known species of flowering plants in the mint family, Lamiaceae. It is native to the Old World and is found from Cape Verde and the Canary Islands, southern Europe across to northern and eastern Africa, the Mediterranean, southwest Asia to southeast India. Many members of the genus are cultivated extensively in temperate climates as ornamental plants for garden and landscape use, for use as culinary herbs, and also commercially for the extraction of essential oils. The most widely cultivated species, Lavandula angustifolia is often referred to as lavender, and there is a colour named for the shade of the flowers of this species.

Mota


Samphire,rock samphire,or sea fennel, Crithmum maritimum, is an edible wild plant, and the sole species of the genus Crithmum. It is found on southern and western coasts of Britain and Ireland, on mediterranean and western coasts of Europe including the Canary Islands, North Africa and the Black Sea. "Samphire" is a name also used for several other unrelated species of coastal plant.

Maginja


Arbutus unedo (strawberry tree, occasionally cane apple) is an evergreen shrub or small tree in the family Ericaceae, native to the Mediterranean region and western Europe north to western France and Ireland. Due to its presence in southwest and northwest Ireland, it is known as either "Irish strawberry tree" or sometimes "Killarney strawberry tree".

Mendula


The almond (/ɑːmənd/) (Prunus dulcis, syn. Prunus amygdalus, Amygdalus communis, Amygdalus dulcis) (or badam in Indian English, from Persian: بادام‎) is a species of tree native to the Middle East and South Asia. "Almond" is also the name of the edible and widely cultivated seed of this tree. Within the genus Prunus, it is classified with the peach in the subgenus Amygdalus, distinguished from the other subgenera by the corrugated shell (endocarp) surrounding the seed.

The fruit of the almond is a drupe, consisting of an outer hull and a hard shell with the seed (which is not a true nut) inside. Shelling almonds refers to removing the shell to reveal the seed. Almonds are sold shelled (i.e., after the shells are removed), or unshelled (i.e., with the shells still attached). Blanched almonds are shelled almonds that have been treated with hot water to soften the seedcoat, which is then removed to reveal the white embryo.

Rogač


Ceratonia siliqua, commonly known as the carob tree, St John's-bread, or locust bean (not to be confused with the African locust bean) is a species of flowering evergreen shrub or tree in the pea family, Fabaceae. It is widely cultivated for its edible pods, and as an ornamental tree in gardens. The ripe, dried pod is often ground to carob powder which is used as a substitute for cocoa powder.

It is native to the Mediterranean region including Southern Europe, Northern Africa, the larger Mediterranean islands; to the Levant and Middle-East of Western Asia into Iran; and to the Canary Islands and Macaronesia.The word carat, a unit of mass for gemstones and a unit of purity for gold alloys, was possibly derived from the Greek word kerátion literally meaning a small horn, and refers to the carob seed as a unit of weight.

Kadulja


Salvia officinalis (sage, also called garden sage, or common sage) is a perennial, evergreen subshrub, with woody stems, grayish leaves, and blue to purplish flowers. It is a member of the family Lamiaceae and is native to the Mediterranean region, though it has naturalized in many places throughout the world. It has a long history of medicinal and culinary use, and in modern times as an ornamental garden plant. The common name "sage" is also used for a number of related and unrelated species.

Smrika


Juniperus oxycedrus (Prickly Juniper, Prickly Cedar, Cade Juniper and Cade (from the French genévrier cade), Sharp Cedar) is a species of juniper, native across the Mediterranean region from Morocco and Portugal, north to southern France, east to westernmost Iran, and south to Lebanon and Israel, growing on a variety of rocky sites from sea level up to 1600 m altitude.The specific epithet oxycedrus means "sharp cedar" and this species may have been the original cedar or cedrus of the ancient Greeks.

Smokva Plavica


Ficus (/ˈfaɪkəs/or/ˈfiːkəs/) is a genus of about 850 species of woody trees, shrubs, vines, epiphytes and hemiepiphytes in the family Moraceae. Collectively known as fig trees or figs, they are native throughout the tropics with a few species extending into the semi-warm temperate zone. The Common Fig (F. carica) is a temperate species native to southwest Asia and the Mediterranean region (from Afghanistan to Portugal), which has been widely cultivated from ancient times for its fruit, also referred to as figs. The fruit of most other species are also edible though they are usually of only local economic importance or eaten as bushfood. However, they are extremely important food resources for wildlife. Figs are also of considerable cultural importance throughout the tropics, both as objects of worship and for their many practical uses.

Grožđe 


A grape is a fruiting berry of the deciduous woody vines of the botanical genus Vitis. Grapes can be eaten raw or they can be used for making wine, jam, juice, jelly, grape seed extract, raisins, vinegar, and grape seed oil. Grapes are a non-climacteric type of fruit, generally occurring in clusters.

Čuvarkuća


Sempervivum tectorum (common houseleek) is a species of flowering plant in the family Crassulaceae, native to the mountains of southern Europe. Growing to 15 cm (6 in) tall by 50 cm (20 in) broad, it is a rosette-forming succulent evergreen perennial, spreading by offsets. It has grey-green, tufted, sessile leaves, 4–10 cm (2–4 in) in diameter, which are often suffused with rose-red. In summer it bears clusters of reddish-purple flowers, in multiples of 8-16, on hairy erect flat-topped stems. The species is highly variable, in part because hundreds of cultivars have been propagated, sold, and traded for nearly 200 years. Sempervivum tectorum was described in 1753 by Linnaeus, who noted that its leaves are ciliate, that is, fringed with hairs.

Kaktus; Opunicija or Indijska smokva


Opuntia humifusa, commonly known as the Eastern Prickly Pear or Indian Fig, is a native cactus found in parts of eastern North America. It ranges from Montana eastward to parts of the southern Great Lakes, and in the dry coastal sand dunes along the eastern seaboard from the Florida Keys to coastal Connecticut and Long Island, NY and westward to New Mexico. The green stems of this low-growing perennial cactus are flattened and are formed of segments. Barbed bristles are found around the surfaces of the segments and longer spines are sometimes present. The flowers are yellow to gold in color and are found along the margins of mature segments. The flowers are waxy and sometimes have red centers. They measure 4-6 cm wide and bloom in the late spring. The juicy and edible red fruits measure from 3-5 cm. As the fruit matures, it changes colour from green to red, and often remains on the cactus until the following spring. There are 6 to 33 small, flat, light-colored seeds in each fruit. This plant is very intolerant of shade. It thrives in full sun and well-drained soil. Some botanists treat this cactus as a variety Opuntia compressa var. humifusa, or a synonym of Opuntia compressa. Those recognizing this species treat Opuntia rafinesquii as a junior synonym.

Maslina


The olive (Listeni/ˈɒlɪv/ or Listeni/ˈɑːləv/, Olea europaea, meaning "olive from/of Europe") is a species of small tree in the family Oleaceae, found in much of Africa, the Mediterranean Basin from Portugal to the Levant, the Arabian Peninsula, and southern Asia as far east as China, as well as the Canary Islands, Mauritius and Réunion. The species is cultivated in many places and considered naturalized in France, Corsica, Crimea, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Syria, Java, Norfolk Island, California and Bermuda. Its fruit, also called the olive, is of major agricultural importance in the Mediterranean region as the source of olive oil. The tree and its fruit give its name to the plant family, which also includes species such as lilacs, jasmine, Forsythia and the true ash trees (Fraxinus). The word derives from Latin ŏlīva ("olive fruit", "olive tree"; "olive oil" is ŏlĕum) which is cognate with the Greek ἐλαία (elaía, "olive fruit", "olive tree") and ἔλαιον (élaion, "olive oil"). The oldest attested forms of the latter two words in Greek are respectively the Mycenaean , e-ra-wa, and , e-ra-wo or, e-rai-wo, written in the Linear B syllabic script. The word "oil" in multiple languages ultimately derives from the name of this tree and its fruit.

Dalmatinski buhač


Dalmatinski buhač (lat. Tanacetum cinerariifolium; sinonim Chrysanthemum cinerariifolium) autohtona je hrvatska biljka iz porodice glavočika, važna kao izvor prirodnog insekticida Piretrina. Raste na jugu Hrvatske, odakle i ime Dalmatinski buhač za razliku od sličnih vrsta Kavkaskog, Perzijskog, Armenskog i dr. vrsta buhača. Dalmatinski buhač izgledom podsjeća na ivančicu, ali mu je cvijet nešto veći. Ima plavkasto-zeleno lišće dužine 45-100 cm. Od biljke se na jugu Hrvatske tradicionalno u vegetativnoj fazi rasta koristi zelena masa za ispašu stoke i u narodnoj medicini, a u generativnoj fazi njezin cvijet kao sirovina za izradu botaničkog insekticida. Insekticidni derivat iz dalmatinskog buhača je bioučinkovit na oko 75% poznatih insekata, ali je i jako nestabilan. Degradacija aktivne tvari iz cvijeta na neškodljive spojeve je vrlo rapidna izloženošću proizvoda običnom zraku, svjetlosti, neodgovarajućoj temperaturi skladištenja, mikrobiološkim faktorima, materijalu transportnog pakiranja, postotku vlage itd. te je nužna odgovarajuća stručnost u manipulaciji i uspješnoj upotrebi.  Rezistentnost insekata ipak postoji te je dokumentirano dokazana u 15 vrsta kukaca.

Gоspinа trаvа   - Hypericum perforatum


Common St John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) is a flowering plant species of the genus Hypericum. It is a medicinal herb with antidepressant properties and potential antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties. Extracts of St John's wort can be used as a treatment for depression. However, it is toxic to livestock when ingested and is considered a weed when growing wild. Hypericum perforatum is indigenous to Europe but has spread worldwide as an invasive species, including to temperate and subtropical regions of Turkey, Ukraine, Russia, the Middle East, India, and China. Other names for St John's wort include Tipton's weed, rosin rose, goatweed, chase-devil, or Klamath weed. In common speech, the name St John's wort may be used to refer to any species of the genus Hypericum. Therefore, H. perforatum is sometimes called Common St John's wort or Perforate St John's wort in order to differentiate it.

Šparoga

Asparagus, common name wild asparagus, is an evergreen perennial plant belonging to the genus Asparagus. The Latin name acutifolius of this species, meaning "thorny leaves", derives from the characteristic shape of the leaves, a quite common feature in the typical plants of the Mediterranean. Asparagus reaches on average 30–70 centimetres (12–28 in) of height. The stems have much-branched feathery foliage. The "leaves" are in fact needle-like modified stems. The flowers are bell-shaped and in small clusters, greenish-white to yellowish, 4.5–5.5 millimetres (0.18–0.22 in) long. The flowers are dioecious (on each plant they are only male or female). In some Mediterranean regions flowering occurs in late Summer from August through September, often after heavy storms. In this case the small green berries, of 5–6 millimetres (0.20–0.24 in) in diameter, are fully ripe in winter.